Loss is an element of dynamic change

Loss is an element of dynamic change

Regardless of whether we initiate change or change is forced upon us, loss is an element of change that needs to be noted, respected, and acted upon. Failure to identify and be ready for the endings and losses that change produces is the largest single problem that we encounter in transition. No one foresees how people will be impacted by a change even when the change is an improvement. We all lament and experience a sense of loss for "what was" whether it's related to our personal life or related to our job.

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THRIVE: Life-changing events are just that: life-changing.

THRIVE: Life-changing events are just that: life-changing.

Reintegrating back into work isn’t easy after a long-term absence or critical illness, for anyone – the returning employee, their co-workers, or the manager.

Life goes on, or so they say, while the person is away. Work carries on, challenges are met, goals change, and the team sort of ‘re-forms’, either figuring out how to ‘get it done’ in spite of a void if the position is left open, or learning to work with a temporary replacement who does their best to fill in.

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Change in the 21st Century is about feelings and perspectives

Change in the 21st Century is about feelings and perspectives

Organizations that expect workers to contribute with their heads and hearts must accept that emotions are essential to the new 21st Century management style. The old management paradigm allowed people to have feelings, as long as the feelings were positive. The new management paradigm affirms that managing people is managing feelings.

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Managing Dynamic Change in 2018

Managing Dynamic Change in 2018

For years, I have witnessed companies struggle with creating a better workplace, good profits, and true growth by introducing improvements into every function and process. Competitive pressures keep increasing, the pace of change keeps accelerating, and companies MUST continually search for higher levels of quality, service, and overall business agility. The treadmill moves faster, companies work harder, but results improve slowly or not at all. Dynamic change is not a DIY project.

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THRIVE: Control, Acceptance, and Letting Go

THRIVE: Control, Acceptance, and Letting Go

Going to discouraging or negative places is natural when coping with an intense life challenge such as critical illness. But how long do you allow yourself to stay there? Can you think of a time when you were in a hard place and all of a sudden, your mood or outlook spontaneously changed for the better? Perhaps you were deep in the flow of your work, out for a walk, or even doing some housework.

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Leadership: How attributional style errors contribute to faulty thinking

Leadership: How attributional style errors contribute to faulty thinking

There is a tendency for us to exaggerate our own talents – to believe we are above average in our endowment of positive traits and abilities - even when being modest in our self-assessment. The inclination to exaggerate our own talents is amplified by our tendency to misperceive the causes of certain events. 

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Leadership: How do you explain good or bad events?

Leadership: How do you explain good or bad events?

When optimists experience negative events, they tend to think "this is temporary, for this particular event only, and I'm not the cause of this event." When optimists experience positive events, they tend to think "This is permanent, this is true for all life events, and I'm the cause." 

An optimist explains the cause of good life events as being permanent, global, and internal: “I succeeded because I'm good.” An optimist explains the cause of bad life events as being temporary, specific, and external:“I failed because that assessment was only examining one part of my ability and it was too difficult.”

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Leadership, positive emotions, and making a difference

Leadership, positive emotions, and making a difference

How often are you or someone around you negative about society, other people, or the world in general?  If only you had the power to change things.  If only you had money like Bill Gates, you could make a difference in life.  Well, the truth is that you can make a difference in this world…and it doesn’t have to cost a thing.

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Leadership: the importance of being optimistic and the pitfalls

Leadership: the importance of being optimistic and the pitfalls

There have been enough corporate scandals in recent times to create healthy skepticism towards optimism. CEOs who project a Pollyanna-ish view that everything’s rosy in the corporation are not necessarily wise or nor effective, and definitely not authentic. Rather, an authentic leader speaks openly and frankly, with realism. When a leader is able to resonate honestly with those he or she leads, he or she can then point out a positive perspective or path available. Leading with optimism, and projecting it for others to adopt, is meant to be done in a realistic manner. 

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Positive Emotions, Leadership, and the Bottom Line

Positive Emotions, Leadership, and the Bottom Line

According to well-documented research from both the Gallup Organization and the Hay Group, roughly 50 to 70 percent of how employees perceive their organization’s climate can be traced to the actions of one person—the leader. More than anyone else, the person in charge creates the conditions and reinforces the tone-from-the-top that directly affect people’s moods at work and ultimately their ability to perform for themselves, their teams, and the organization.

A positive climate protects the bottom line by protecting the organization's reputation; reducing employee turnover; preventing incidents of workplace violence and harassment and complaints involving Human Rights and Ministry of Labour; protecting the business owners and leaders from personal liability. Hence, an authentic positive climate requires a conscious daily moment-by-moment commitment beyond town-hall meetings, team-building events, and rah-rah meetings.

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