Leadership: How attributional style errors contribute to faulty thinking

Leadership: How attributional style errors contribute to faulty thinking

There is a tendency for us to exaggerate our own talents – to believe we are above average in our endowment of positive traits and abilities - even when being modest in our self-assessment. The inclination to exaggerate our own talents is amplified by our tendency to misperceive the causes of certain events. 

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Leadership: How do you explain good or bad events?

Leadership: How do you explain good or bad events?

When optimists experience negative events, they tend to think "this is temporary, for this particular event only, and I'm not the cause of this event." When optimists experience positive events, they tend to think "This is permanent, this is true for all life events, and I'm the cause." 

An optimist explains the cause of good life events as being permanent, global, and internal: “I succeeded because I'm good.” An optimist explains the cause of bad life events as being temporary, specific, and external:“I failed because that assessment was only examining one part of my ability and it was too difficult.”

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Leadership, positive emotions, and making a difference

Leadership, positive emotions, and making a difference

How often are you or someone around you negative about society, other people, or the world in general?  If only you had the power to change things.  If only you had money like Bill Gates, you could make a difference in life.  Well, the truth is that you can make a difference in this world…and it doesn’t have to cost a thing.

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Leadership: the importance of being optimistic and the pitfalls

Leadership: the importance of being optimistic and the pitfalls

There have been enough corporate scandals in recent times to create healthy skepticism towards optimism. CEOs who project a Pollyanna-ish view that everything’s rosy in the corporation are not necessarily wise or nor effective, and definitely not authentic. Rather, an authentic leader speaks openly and frankly, with realism. When a leader is able to resonate honestly with those he or she leads, he or she can then point out a positive perspective or path available. Leading with optimism, and projecting it for others to adopt, is meant to be done in a realistic manner. 

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Positive Emotions, Leadership, and the Bottom Line

Positive Emotions, Leadership, and the Bottom Line

According to well-documented research from both the Gallup Organization and the Hay Group, roughly 50 to 70 percent of how employees perceive their organization’s climate can be traced to the actions of one person—the leader. More than anyone else, the person in charge creates the conditions and reinforces the tone-from-the-top that directly affect people’s moods at work and ultimately their ability to perform for themselves, their teams, and the organization.

A positive climate protects the bottom line by protecting the organization's reputation; reducing employee turnover; preventing incidents of workplace violence and harassment and complaints involving Human Rights and Ministry of Labour; protecting the business owners and leaders from personal liability. Hence, an authentic positive climate requires a conscious daily moment-by-moment commitment beyond town-hall meetings, team-building events, and rah-rah meetings.

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THRIVE: Getting back in the saddle after a setback

THRIVE: Getting back in the saddle after a setback

By guest blogger, Liza Provenzano, SparkHR.

It’s understandable to feel lousy when a setback occurs. Several setbacks in succession can really throw us off. However, at some point, it’s time to get back in the saddle, tap into that wiser side of oneself, and look at the next step. Ignoring the negative mind chatter opens up space in our minds for more useful thinking to emerge. This is the thinking that is practical, composed and wise.

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Leadership and Inspiring Positive Emotions

Leadership and Inspiring Positive Emotions

The ability to inspire positive feelings in others is a key leadership quality. The ability to cultivate our own positive feelings is equally important for our own health and well-being. When we feel good, we perform better, are more creative and more productive. Good feelings are like lubrication to the brain—mental efficiency goes up, memory is sharpened, we can understand directions and make better decisions.

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THRIVE: Make it count: Self-exploration of purpose and fulfillment after critical illness

THRIVE: Make it count: Self-exploration of purpose and fulfillment after critical illness

Critical illness impacts every aspect of our lives and our work-selves are not excluded. Experiencing critical illness can certainly drive the importance of living well and connecting to what feels true. On top of everything we are managing, this process can be daunting. When feeling overwhelmed, most of us tend to shut down and understandably so when we have gone through the trauma of managing life-threatening illness. To live as wholly and completely as we are able, thinking about what will bring real fulfillment is worthwhile. The comforting news is that you have the answers!

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Lopsided leadership - Goldilocks leadership

Lopsided leadership - Goldilocks leadership

Too much strategic thinking leads to not enough attention to operational details. Too much dominance and hard-driving encouragement leads to not enough listening and empathy to individuals.

How can leaders manage people by using their strengths “just right” without overextending them to the point where they become liabilities? How do leaders take full advantage of their natural talents, without going too far? The first step is to acknowledge where you overuse your strengths. 

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THRIVE: Realign and reinvent after critical illness

THRIVE: Realign and reinvent after critical illness

After experiencing a life-changing and traumatic event such as cancer or other critical illness, some of what used to take up our thought space might seem to matter less and other aspects of our lives and desires become more important.

For many of us, high performance or reaching a certain financial status have been key priorities. While these goals and all our remarkable achievements have played a vital role and we have worked hard to get to where we are, ultimately work is unstable. This part of life can change in an instant, as most of us experience at some point.

Something that we all can access that tends to be fairly reliable is our inner wisdom or intuition. Tapping into this personal resource can serve as a guide on our path to discovering what is meaningful, what feels most authentic for ourselves.

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